The God of Small Things

The God of Small Things

Book - 1997
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"They all crossed into forbidden territory. They all tampered with the laws that lay down who should be loved and how. And how much. " The year is 1969. In the state of Kerala, on the southernmost tip of India, a skyblue Plymouth with chrome tailfins is stranded on the highway amid a Marxist workers' demonstration. Inside the car sit two-egg twins Rahel and Esthappen, and so begins their tale. . . . Armed only with the invincible innocence of children, they fashion a childhood for themselves in the shade of the wreck that is their family--their lonely, lovely mother, Ammu (who loves by night the man her children love by day), their blind grandmother, Mammachi (who plays Handel on her violin), their beloved uncle Chacko (Rhodes scholar, pickle baron, radical Marxist, bottom-pincher), their enemy, Baby Kochamma (ex-nun and incumbent grandaunt), and the ghost of an imperial entomologist's moth (with unusually dense dorsal tufts). When their English cousin, Sophie Mol, and her mother, Margaret Kochamma, arrive on a Christmas visit, Esthappen and Rahel learn that Things Can Change in a Day. That lives can twist into new, ugly shapes, even cease forever, beside their river "graygreen."  With fish in it. With the sky and trees in it. And at night, the broken yellow moon in it. The brilliantly plotted story uncoils with an agonizing sense of foreboding and inevitability. Yet nothing prepares you for what lies at the heart of it. The God of Small Things takes on the Big Themes--Love. Madness. Hope. Infinite Joy. Here is a writer who dares to break the rules. To dislocate received rhythms and create the language she requires, a language that is at once classical and unprecedented. Arundhati Roy has given us a book that is anchored to anguish, but fueled by wit and magic.
Publisher: New York : Random House, c1997.
Edition: 1st U.S. ed.
ISBN: 9780679457312
0679457313
Branch Call Number: FIC/ROY
Characteristics: 321 p. ; 22 cm.

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m
mocatwoman
Dec 13, 2017

Beautiful, well written story -- I just returned from visiting the state of Kerala in Southern India (my guide recommended the title), and the novel captures life in that area so well. 5 Stars.

t
thelibrarylush
Dec 07, 2017

November (?) book for Restricted Section book group

d
Dyslexicon
Oct 12, 2017

Page 1 vocabulary and it's only half a page.
brooding
dissolute
bluebottles
vacuously
suffused
sullen
laterite
ply
PWD
Someone said, "There is but one rule in writing; Be clear." I may read this but I'm going to have to get the electronic version where you click and instantly get definitions.

a
ALICESOOT
Aug 24, 2017

One of my all time favourites.
After visiting India, I developed a life long love affair with its food, people and culture. Reading this novel was like going deep sea diving for the first time, except this novel isn't about fish! Roy takes you diving under the surface of India, right beneath the chaos and the madness, she shows you a world that is inaccessible to the occasional tourist like myself.
Her prose is arresting, her metaphors stop your heart and make you sit back in your chair to admire their beauty. What Roy does with 'love' in this novel is truly beautiful and I don't think it would be the same were it set anywhere else but India.

g
graybear1
Jun 05, 2017

Good Lord! Why only ONE copy of this in the system?!

b
brangwinn
May 16, 2016

What sets Roy's wring apart from others is her creative use of language. Imagine the farting of mud as steps are taken. She was you in the story telling hat happened before and hat happens after, but it is is not till the end that she tells you what happened. Telling the story through the inexperience of twins also helps convey the story of innocent people caught in actions of which they have no control. I was glad I had visited Cochin before reading this, it gave me a better idea of the lushness of the natural beauty.

e
EmilyEm
Oct 20, 2015

The sense of place and point of view are part of what makes this story a poignant, unforgettable tale of love and innocence lost. I read it this week as this year's Man Booker winner was announced. Amazing storytelling, steeped in the culture and politics of the Kerala region of India. I’ll be thinking of this family for a long time.

p
Persnickety77
Dec 08, 2014

Very visceral writing, and a very sad story

l
llongpine
Dec 05, 2014

Plot moves very slowly. I couldn't get past page 19.

Chapel_Hill_KenMc Nov 23, 2014

Exquisite writing and unforgettable characters mark this family tragedy set amidst the caste prejudices of India. You'll find this on many critics' Top Ten lists.

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Quotes

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lokiboo262 Jun 11, 2012

"she was thirty one not too old, not too young,but a viable dieable age"

g
Gumbosplat
Mar 02, 2012

And so, for practical purposes, in a hopelessly practical world...

n
ndp21f
Mar 01, 2010

And truth be told, it was no small wondering matter.
Because Ammu had not had the kind of education, nor read the sorts of people, that might have influenced her to think the way she did.
She was just that sort of animal.

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lokiboo262 Jun 11, 2012

lokiboo262 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 16 and 29

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kokosowe
Sep 22, 2009

kokosowe thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

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lokiboo262 Jun 11, 2012

Through a series of events two one egg twins are seperated by fate and the actions of those around them. They eventually come back and they rekindle their bond somewhat too close for the the comfort of their nosy grand aunt- Baby Kotchama.

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