Strange Brew

Strange Brew

Alcohol and Government Monopoly

eBook - 2015
Rate this:
When prohibition ended in 1933, laws were passed that regulated the sale of alcoholic beverages, ostensibly to protect wholesalers from the depredations of suppliers and the public from the ill effects of alcohol. This book examines the monopoly protection laws, also known as franchise termination laws, and how they lock suppliers into government-mandated contracts with alcohol wholesalers that affect consumers by raising prices and reducing the quality of alcoholic products and services. This study also investigates the notion that alcohol consumption is a sin and how legal restrictions have substituted the moral judgment of legislators for that of the consumer. Strange Brew demonstrates that the monopoly protection laws reflect powerful special interests in the political process who use such measures to control markets, shield themselves from competition and consumer preferences, and set prices with relative impunity. This book will be of great value to those in the alcoholic beverage industry as well as to students of economics, regulation, and public policy. --Provided by publisher.
Publisher: [Place of publication not identified] : Independent Institute, 2015.
ISBN: 9781598132625
Branch Call Number: EBOOK
Characteristics: data file
1 online resource (100 pages)

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at SDPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top