Kraken

Kraken

The Curious, Exciting, and Slightly Disturbing Science of Squid

Book - 2011
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Kraken is the traditional name for gigantic sea monsters, and this book introduces one of the most charismatic, enigmatic, and curious inhabitants of the sea: the squid. The pages take the reader on a wild narrative ride through the world of squid science and adventure, along the way addressing some riddles about what intelligence is, and what monsters lie in the deep. In addition to squid, both giant and otherwise, Kraken examines other equally enthralling cephalopods, including the octopus and the cuttlefish, and explores their otherworldly abilities, such as camouflage and bioluminescence. Accessible and entertaining, Kraken is also the first substantial volume on the subject in more than a decade and a must for fans of popular science.

Praise for KRAKEN: The Curious, Exciting, and Slightly Disturbing Science of Squid 

"Williams writes with a deft, supple hand as she surveys these spindly, extraordinary beasts and their world. She reminds us that the known world might be considerably larger than in the days of the bestiary-makers, but there is still room for wonder and strangeness."
-Los Angeles Times.com

"Williams's account of squid, octopuses, and other cephalopods abounds with both ancient legend and modern science." 
-Discover 

"[Exposes squid's] eerie similarities to the human species, down to eye structure and the all-important brain cell, the neuron." 
- New York Post 

"just the right mix of history and science" 
-ForeWord Reviews

"Kraken is an engaging and expansive biography of a creature that sparks our imagination and stimulates our curiosity. It's a perfect blend of storytelling and science." 
-Vincent Pieribone, author of Aglow in the Dark

KRAKEN extracts pure joy, intellectual exhilaration, and deep wonder from the most unlikely of places--squid. It is hard to read Wendy Williams's luminous account and not feel the thrill of discovery of the utterly profound connections we share with squid and all other living things on the planet. With wit, passion, and skill as a storyteller, Williams has given us a beautiful window into our world and ourselves. --Neil Shubin, author of the national bestseller " Your Inner Fish " 

Wendy William's KRAKEN weaves vignettes of stories about historical encounters with squid and octopus, with stories of today's scientists who are captivated by these animals. Her compelling book has the power to change your world-view about these creatures of the sea, while telling the gripping, wholly comprehensible story of the ways in which these animals have changed human medical history. --Mark J. Spalding, President, The Ocean Foundation



Publisher: New York : Abrams Image, 2011, c2010.
ISBN: 9780810984653
0810984652
Branch Call Number: 594.58/WILLIAMS
Characteristics: 223 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.

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MACDONALDE6
Nov 10, 2014

This is a little differnet than the usual type of book I read. It is full of facts, history, and scientific research.
I really enjoyed it, I finished it feeling smarter and it further confirmed how much I would love to live closer to the ocean to see all the wonders it holds.

AnneDromeda Aug 15, 2011

It's sunny and beautiful, the sand is warm under your feet and the breeze has died just enough that it's getting a little sticky on the beach. You dip a toe into the water - tentatively at first, then you give the ripples a little kick, just to see the sparkle. Next thing you know, you've plunged in over your head. Floating on your back, face warmed by the sun, supported by the cool depths, you think, “this is perfect.” Then, unbidden: “What I can't see below, can't hurt me.” Maybe you scull a little closer back to shore on that thought. Thus is ever was – no one can resist a good sea monster story.
<br />
And that's just what Wendy Williams gives us with *Kraken.* As with so many other popular science books in the last few years, *Kraken* is a sleek, quick read designed to give the best information - minus the overload - in a good story.
<br />
The title is a slight misnomer – *Kraken* deals also with the octopus, cuttlefish and nautilus, not just squid. The book opens by discussing the veracity of the more particularly terrifying stories of giant squid. Williams takes care to give readers all the creepy squid-attack details before turning to science to find the more truthful proportions of the fish stories. And the science is mighty interesting: Some species of squid really do have razor-like rings in their suckers that can help shred prey as the feeding tentacles draw it toward the squid's gnashing beak; other squid show great skill in problem solving (squid and octopi can take particularly creative approaches to spacial puzzles because they lack skeletons).
<br />
Having taken the time to creep out her readers with facts even weirder than squid fiction, Williams moves on to wider territory, like neuroscience. Turns out cephalopods have taught us an awful lot of what we know about the human brain. To find out what, particularly, Williams takes the reader onto ship's decks, into labs and aquariums, and even into the cephalopods themselves. This is to say nothing of the sex life of squid, which is horrifying enough to make The Bachelorette look romantic.
<br />
With her knack for narrative nonfiction and her genuine sense of wonder, Williams' *Kraken* resonates more deeply than readers will expect. This book is recommended to readers who've enjoyed popular science writing like Bryson's *A Short History of Nearly Everything*. At a slight 200 pages, it packs a lot of juicy information in an entertaining package.

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AnneDromeda Aug 15, 2011

It's sunny and beautiful, the sand is warm under your feet and the breeze has died just enough that it's getting a little sticky on the beach. You dip a toe into the water - tentatively at first, then you give the ripples a little kick, just to see the sparkle. Next thing you know, you've plunged in over your head. Floating on your back, face warmed by the sun, supported by the cool depths, you think, “this is perfect.” Then, unbidden: “What I can't see below, can't hurt me.” Maybe you scull a little closer back to shore on that thought. Thus is ever was – no one can resist a good sea monster story. <br /> And that's just what Wendy Williams gives us with *Kraken.* As with so many other popular science books in the last few years, *Kraken* is a sleek, quick read designed to give the best information - minus the overload - in a good story. <br /> The title is a slight misnomer – *Kraken* deals also with the octopus, cuttlefish and nautilus, not just squid. The book opens by discussing the veracity of the more particularly terrifying stories of giant squid. Williams takes care to give readers all the creepy squid-attack details before turning to science to find the more truthful proportions of the fish stories. And the science is mighty interesting: Some species of squid really do have razor-like rings in their suckers that can help shred prey as the feeding tentacles draw it toward the squid's gnashing beak; other squid show great skill in problem solving (squid and octopi can take particularly creative approaches to spacial puzzles because they lack skeletons). <br /> Having taken the time to creep out her readers with facts even weirder than squid fiction, Williams moves on to wider territory, like neuroscience. Turns out cephalopods have taught us an awful lot of what we know about the human brain. To find out what, particularly, Williams takes the reader onto ship's decks, into labs and aquariums, and even into the cephalopods themselves. This is to say nothing of the sex life of squid, which is horrifying enough to make The Bachelorette look romantic. <br /> With her knack for narrative nonfiction and her genuine sense of wonder, Williams' *Kraken* resonates more deeply than readers will expect. This book is recommended to readers who've enjoyed popular science writing like Bryson's *A Short History of Nearly Everything*. At a slight 200 pages, it packs a lot of juicy information in an entertaining package.

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